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BMW M2 Competition: Munich’s twin turbo tacker

BMW’s M2 Competition is here and it’s probably more than we could hope for.

BMW M2 Competition

BMW M2 Competition

No sooner had BMW’s rip-snorting M2 hit the roads we wondered what it would be like if it was closer to the M4 spec. As the bigger M3/M4 reaches the end of its life, BMW faces a bit of a hole in the go-fast line-up. Whenever a new 3 launches, the variants take a while to trickle through, the Ms coming close to last.

So, as the M4 and M3 CS takes the parallel lines to the back paddock (with a bang, granted), Bavaria’s go-faster division is giving us the M2 Competition.

It’s a twin-turbo

BMW M2 Competition engine

Yah-huh. While the M2  has a single turbo N55 delivering a very respectable 272kW (370PS) and 465Nm, the Competition has even more. As if lifted straight from an M4, the M2 now has two turbos to produce 302kW (410PS) and 550Nm. Power is up 30kW (40PS) and there’s a whopping 85Nm extra twist. Let’s have a little reality check here – the M4 Pure has 331kW (450PS) and…550Nm. That means fireworks. Proper, proper fireworks. The M2 is a fair bit lighter, you see.

Max power is available from 5250rpm all the way to 7000rpm while max torque runs from 2350 to 5200rpm.

With the seven-speed twin clutch, BMW says the M2C will hit 100km/h (0-62mph) in 4.2 seconds. Look, I reckon it’ll do a four dead. I think BMW is being modest/sparing M4 owners’ feelings.

The six-speed manual gearbox (a no-cost option in some markets, including Australia) features  carbon fibre friction lining to reduce weight. It also has wet sump lubrication which BMW says reduces “sloshing.” I know that annoys me a lot in other manuals.

With extra turbos and power comes extra heat. The M2C’s cooling system is based on the M4 CS’s, with a bit central radiator, two smaller radiators off to each side and a separate oil cooler.

A new bi-modal four-outlet exhaust – with black chrome tips – should make the right noises and look the part.

Chassis

BMW M2 Competition

The basic M2’s chassis is a proper sparkler. I know I keep saying it, but I reckon the M2 redefined  modern M car. While the current M4 is a terrific thing, it wasn’t until the M2 and then the M4 CS that I truly felt the heights of the E92 were back – and surpassed.

Suspension is by forged aluminium control arms and the rear axle subframe is mounted rigidly to the chassis. A carbon fibre strut brace – weighing just 1500g – snakes around the engine bay and looks amazing.

Between the rear wheels the Active M Differential works hard to keep things straight and/or fun. When you’re in Sport+ this thing is already fun personified, so with all that extra grunt…I dunno. It’s going to be quite something.

The M2C has steering wheel mounted M1 and M2 buttons to activate personalised dynamic setups. Not only that, they activate M Dynamic Mode which means plenty of tail-waggling fun and a turn in so sharp it’ll split you in two. I can’t stress enough how much a limited-slip diff can transform a car and an M diff is brilliant when done right.

If you’re super-keen, BMW will sell you a set of 19-inch forged alloys with Y-shaped spokes. They look mean.

Also available as an option is the M Sport brake system. That means 400mm discs up front and 380mm at the rear. The front callipers are six pot monsters, the rears four. There isn’t much wrong the M2 brakes to start with, so these will be enormously strong.

Design

BMW M2 Competition

Things have changed inside and out. The front bumper and kidney grille are even more aggressive. The kidney grille itself is a slightly different design with a black paint job. The double arm mirrors add a little extra M flavour, with darker badging scattered around.

Open the door and the sill plates let you know you’re stepping into a special. Thankfully, the uninspiring M2 seats have been replaced with much better-looking and presumably more effective front seats that look great. They also have that naff illuminated badge from the M4.

The dashboard is also part-digital, which BMW calls Black Panel.

With all that, it looks and feels more like a proper M car, which is how it drives already.

We’ll get our hands on one as soon as is humanly possible.

 

Scroll down for heaps more photos.

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M2 Competition Exterior Photos

M2 Competition Interior Photos

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